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Google Toilet funny Video exposes SOPA and PIPA bill mess

With the evolution of the Internet, our day to day life is getting better and more  easier, but at the same time, living life online is somehow bad for some people even it may be you. The reason being that, using the internet and living the internet life can cause us to lose our private data into the wrong hands. Google is known as the number one search engine provider online and it is a friend to many online busines owners because it drives traffic to their websites.

Here I present you a funny video, Google Toilet video, which is totally a humor and sarcasm video that shows how Google badly needs our information in order to show advertisement. Though, it is humor-like video, but this can turn into a reality if the SOPA and PIPA bill was passed. But, God saved the internet for us and now no one can enters into your private life as we first taught it would be if the bill was cleared okay.

google toilet funny video

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This Google funny video is really a cool and interesting video you should watch and even, I’m laughing here because of this video alone. And if you love Google very much, you should try as much as possible to check this funny video out.

[via SML]

TechInLine – The Best Remote Access Tool Ever -latest post

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SOPA Supporters On The Run – What is Happening?

Supporters in Washington for the SOPA anti-piracy bill in the Congress house (and its Senate equivalent, PIPA), are becoming smaller by the day. After some weeks of mounting uproar online, some Congressional leaders have started backpedaling last week, and the Obama Administration come in on Saturday in response to many online petitions to stop the bills. And the White House then issued a clear rejection of some of the main principles of SOPA.

no to sopa and pipaWhile the many in the House supports the major goal of the bills, the growing chorus of complaints about the ham-fisted way the law is going to be implemented may finally be acting as a counter weight to all the media-company lobbying which is trying to push the bills through. In fact, the White house blog on the subject almost amounts to a pre-veto of the bills as they now stand (and which have yet to be voted on, much less approved, by either house of Congress).

Specifically, the White House states:

“While we believe that online piracy by foreign websites is a serious problem that requires a serious legislative response, we will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk, or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet.”

The big problem with SOPA is in the way it is supposed to be enforced, namely by blocking domain-name system (DNS) servers of copyright-infringing websites. But DNS servers are a basic technical component of the Internet (they translate site names like techcrunch.com into numerical IP addresses computers can understand better).

Blocking DNS of websites without a full adversarial hearing in a court room raises the potential for censoring speech and other lawful activities. It is also the same method China uses to block “offending” content from China’s Internet. The practice also undermines new security protocols. The White House acknowledges:

“We must avoid creating new cybersecurity risks or disrupting the underlying architecture of the Internet”

Thank you. But it still is not clear how the objectives of the bills can be achieved without causing damage to the Internet. Congress should come up with a different mechanism for going after foreign pirate sites or else kill the bills entirely.

“SOPA supporters may be rethinking their positions, but they have not retreated entirely. Online SOPA opponents should not be doing any victory dances just yet.”

For more on SOPA, watch this interview: